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Ban the Bomb!

Apr 29, 2021 2:00:00 PM

British peace activist Michael Randle led an turbulent and extraordinary life – vividly traced in Martin Levy’s book “Ban the Bomb!”.

“This wonderful book of conversations offers a rare glimpse into the lived experience of Cold War pacifism in Britain. There are lively accounts of the first direct action protests, the uptake and transformation of Gandhian ideals, and the battle against nuclear imperialism. Ban the Bomb! is highly recommended reading for anyone interested in the stakes of nonviolent resistance.”— Leela Gandhi, Brown University

Reviews:

“This book is a fascinating insight into one of the major figures of modern British pacifism. In these interviews Michael Randle talks revealingly about his decades of peace and anti-nuclear activism, and his founding role in such pivotal movements and events as the Committee of 100 and the Aldermaston Marches. The result is a remarkable personal testimony, with a striking cast of characters ranging from Kwame Nkrumah and Bertrand Rusell, to Frantz Fanon and Arnold Wesker. Candid, engaging and often witty, it is also a powerful statement of principle.”— Munro Price, Professor of Modern European History at the University of Bradford

“A fascinating insight into the life and times of one of Britain’s most influential pacifists. Michael Randle’s recollections are piercing and vivid. This is invaluable reading for anyone wishing to understand the challenges and evolution of peace activism since 1945.”— Christopher R. Hill, University of South Wales, author of Peace and Power in Cold War Britain: Media, Movements and Democracy, c.1945-68 (Bloomsbury Academic, 2018)

About the book:

During the 1950s, Michael Randle helped pioneer a new form of direct action against nuclear war, based on the teachings of Mahatma Gandhi. At the forefront of the British campaign, he worked closely with Peace News editor Hugh Brock (1914–1985) and other distinguished ‘anti-nuclear pacifists’ such as Pat Arrowsmith, April Carter, and Ian Dixon, serving as chairman of the Direct Action Committee against Nuclear War (1958-1961) and secretary of the Committee of 100 (1960-1961). In 1966, he helped ‘spring’ the Russian spy George Blake from Wormwood Scrubs Prison. Thereafter, he campaigned vigorously on behalf of the Greek democratic opposition, conscientious objectors, and Soviet dissidents. He has always been a man of rare candor and singular energy and principles, even enduring imprisonment for his beliefs. Nowadays, Michael lives in Shipley near Bradford, where he continues to write as a respected expert on ‘people power’. Martin Levy’s interviews with Michael Randle introduce the reader to a tumultuous life that is nothing short of extraordinary.

 

About the author:

Martin Levy is a librarian at the University of Bradford. He has published books and articles on a variety of subjects including anti-psychiatry, the free universities movement of the 1960s, and 18th-century social history. This is his first book of interviews.

 

Library access:

Ask your university library to get library access: For institutional customers, ibidem’s catalogue is available via direct online access for their users and / or employees.

Please contact our library service at library@ibidem.eu for further information and for ordering an online subscription.

Posted By Janina Wittlif

Ukraine vs. Darkness

Apr 20, 2021 2:00:00 PM

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Posted By Janina Wittlif
Jakob Hauter, PhD Candidate in Slavonic and East European Studies at UCL, wrote an article about his research, his work with forensic architecture, and his forthcoming book Civil War? Interstate War? Hybrid War?“ – an anthology that takes stock of what has become known about the war in eastern Ukraine's Donets Basin (Donbas) between April 2014 and mid-2020.
Hauter's article deals with the question of what the current troop build-up means for the region. After all, there are reports that Russia has currently moved a large number of troops and military equipment toward the Ukrainian border. Is there a risk of a new escalation of violence in the region?

The Conversation is an independent source of news and views, sourced from the academic and research community and delivered direct to the public.
Posted By Janina Wittlif

Allegory in Early Greek Philosophy

Mar 25, 2021 2:00:00 PM

Allegory in Early Greek Philosophy” – written by Jennifer Lobo Meeks – examines the role that allegory plays in Greek thought, particularly in the transition from the mythic tradition of the archaic poets to the philosophical traditions of the Presocratics and Plato.

Featured Review:

”At a time when philosophical writing is dominated by literal-mindedness, on the one hand, and 'unmasking,' on the other hand, Jennifer Lobo Meeks takes us back to the poetic origins of philosophy, when allegory preserved the mysterious character of poetic wisdom for the ancient Greek philosophers. Only this preservation of mystery could allow the philosopher to perform the speculative task of articulating the Whole. Beginning with the Presocratics and tracing out the senses of a Presocratic 'poetics,' she takes up the 'ancient quarrel' between philosophy and poetry in Plato, illuminating the use of philosophical myth in the dialogues. This book is not only a reminder of the philosopher’s original task, it helps us to understand the poverty of the present condition of philosophy." – Ann Hartle, Professor Emeritus, Emory University

About the book:

“Allegory in Early Greek Philosophy” explores how a mode of speech that "says one thing, but means another" is integral to philosophy, which otherwise seeks to achieve clarity and precision in its discourse. By providing the early Greek thinkers with a way of defending and appropriating the poetic wisdom of their predecessors, allegory enables philosophy to locate and recover its own origins in the mythic tradition. Allegory allows philosophy simultaneously to move beyond mythos and express the whole in terms of logos, a rational account in which reality is represented in a more abstract and universal way than myth allows.

About the author:

Jennifer Lobo Meeks, PhD, is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Perimeter College of Georgia State University. She specializes in ancient Greek philosophy and in the history of modern European philosophy.

Library access:

Ask your university library to get library access: For institutional customers, ibidem’s catalogue is available via direct online access for their users and / or employees.

Please contact our library service at library@ibidem.eu for further information and for ordering an online subscription.

 

Posted By Janina Wittlif

ibidem author and Honorary President of Ukrainian PEN Dr. Mykola Riabchuk reflects his personal experiences as a Ukrainian intellectual in the context of the cultural and political "Europeanization" of his country since his youth in the Soviet era in his new book "At the Fence of Metternich's Garden".


On April 21st, he will discuss his experience with Ukraine experts in another online seminar of the new programme of webinars introducing the “Ukrainian Voices” book series.


The book launch of "At the Fence of Metternich's Garden" will be followed by a panel discussion. In addition to author Dr. Mykola Riabchuk, the panellists are James Sheer, an associate fellow of Chatham House, who wrote the foreword for Mykola’s book and Andreas Umland, series editor of “Ukrainian Voices” and “Soviet and Post-Soviet Politics and Society”.

Date and Time


Wed, 21 April 2021

18:00 – 19:30 CEST


For more information and registration click here.

Posted By Janina Wittlif

To See or Not to See

Mar 4, 2021 2:00:00 PM

Blind since birth, Inez De Florio recovered her eyesight at the age of 48. In "To See or Not to See – My Recovery from Blindness" she describes the moving, fascinating and true story of her recovery and how she mastered learning to see. 

About the book: 

Eyesight seems to be completely effortless for us, but for persons blind since birth these processes of adaptation are overwhelmingly demanding. For that reason, more than half of the patients commit suicide within the first years after successful surgery. De Florio, whose late recovery from blindness did not stop her from making a brilliant academic career as a professor in didactics, foreign languages, and intercultural communication, not only reveals astounding insights into the world of the visually impaired and their interactions with sighted people. Based on newest scientific findings, she also offers an illuminating report on how to learn to see and how to appreciate visual perception without over-emphasizing the importance of eyesight. 

About the author: 

Prof. Dr. Inez De Florio taught foreign languages and intercultural communication in the department of Humanities of Kassel University, Germany.

In recent years, De Florio has engaged in qualitative and quantitative empirical research about questions of educational psychology focusing on the role of digitization, AI, and robotics in teaching and learning.

Library access: 

Ask your university library to get library access: For institutional customers, ibidem’s catalogue is available via direct online access for their users and / or employees. 

Please contact our library service at library@ibidem.eu for further information and for ordering an online subscription. 

Posted By Janina Wittlif

The Treblinka Death Camp

Mar 2, 2021 2:00:00 PM

"The Treblinka Death Camp: History, Biographies, Remembrance" is not the first book about the Treblinka death camp - but it is a stand-out. Webb and Chocholaty's work presents the definitive account of one of history's most notorious death factories, where some 800,000 people lost their lives. The Nazis who ran the camp, the Ukrainian guards and maids, the Jewish survivors, and the Poles who lived in the camp's shadow - every aspect is covered in this stunningly comprehensive work.

For this second, revised edition, the authors have incorporated new information and provided sources for the Jewish Memorial Roll.

Review:

"A mightily important book, one sure to contribute to both scholarly and popular understandings of this human inferno – highly relevant for those wanting to better understand the Nazis' unprecedented, industrialized mass-murder that formed such a horrifically integral part of the Holocaust." – Dr. Matthew Feldmann, Teesside University

About the book:

“The Treblinka Death Camp: History, Biographies, Remembrance” attempts to provide a Roll of Remembrance with biographies of the Jews who perished in the death camp as well as of those who escaped from Treblinka in individual efforts or as part of the mass prisoner uprising on August 2nd, 1943. It also includes unique and previously unpublished sketches of the camp's ramp area and gas chamber, drawn by the survivors. For this second, revised edition, the authors incorporated new information and provided sources for the Jewish Roll of Remembrance. A significant number of new entries have been added. The Roll of Remembrance has also been greatly expanded to include the names of Jews deported from Germany to Treblinka. In addition, more names have been added to the Perpetrators’ biographies, and other entries have also been enhanced with additional information.

 

About the author:

Chris Webb has been studying the Holocaust for over forty years. He is the co-founder of the Holocaust Education and Archive Research Team (H.E.A.R.T), one of the most visited websites on the Holocaust in the world.

 

Michal Chocholatý is a historian who focuses on Treblinka and Sobibor.

 

Library access:

Ask your university library to get library access: For institutional customers, ibidem’s catalogue is available via direct online access for their users and / or employees.

Please contact our library service at library@ibidem.eu for further information and for ordering an online subscription.

Posted By Janina Wittlif

Our author Mychailo Wynnyckyj, Canadian-Ukrainian Professor and a first-hand observer of Maidan, held a book presentation live online in February and shared his insights about the Ukrainian Revolution of Dignity in conversation with Ukraine experts Professor Andreas Umland and Dr Olesya Khromeychuk. You can find a video of this fascinating discussion here

About the book

In his recent book Ukraine's Maidan, Russia's War, published as the first volume of the Ukrainian Voices book series, Professor Wynnyckyj provides a chronicle of Ukraine’s Maidan and Russia’s on-going war and puts forth an analysis of the Revolution of Dignity from the perspective of a participant observer.

About the series

The Ukrainian Voices book series includes English- and German-language monographs, edited volumes, document collections, and anthologies of articles authored and composed by Ukrainian politicians, intellectuals, activists, officials, researchers, entrepreneurs, artists, and diplomats. The series aims to introduce Western and broader audiences to Ukrainian explorations and interpretations of historic and current domestic as well as international affairs. The purpose of these books is to familiarize non-Ukrainian readers with how some prominent Ukrainians approach, research, and assess their country’s development and position in the world. The series was founded in 2019 and is edited by Andreas Umland.

Posted By Janina Wittlif

In "History and Race in Caryl Phillips's The Nature of Blood," Maria Festa examines the 1997 novel "Caryl Phillips's The Nature of Blood," which deals with exclusion and discrimination throughout history, with a particular focus on the Jewish and African Diasporas. In her work Festa also provides a historical excursus on the concept of race.

Review:

"In her reading of Caryl Phillips’s The Nature of Blood, Maria Festa studies the unique ways in which the narrative of racism, Nazi camps, traumatic memory, and black consciosness meet the issues of historical imagination. Literature and traumatic fiction are here once again the source of a tenacious counter-memory." – Roberto Beneduce, Professor of Medical and Psychological Anthropology, University of Turin, and co-author of Frantz Fanon: Psychiatry and Politics

About the book:

This monograph examines Caryl Phillips’s The Nature of Blood (1997), a novel exploring recurring expressions of exclusion and discrimination throughout history with particular focus on Jewish and African Diasporas and the storytelling of its migrant characters. Particular attention is given to the analysis of characters revealing different facets of the Jewish question. Maria Festa also provides a historical excursus on the notion of race and considers another character alluding to Shakespeare’s Othello to expose the paradoxes of the relationship between subjugator and subjugated. The study makes the case that among the novel’s most remarkable achievements is Phillips’s effort to redress the absence of the Other from our history, that by depicting experiences of displacement, and by confronting readers with seemingly disconnected narrative fragments, The Nature of Blood is a reminder of the missing stories, the voices – marginalised and often racialized – that Western history has consistently failed to include in its accounts of the past and arguably its present.

 

About the author:

Maria Festa has an MA in Anglophone Postcolonial Literature from the Department of Foreign Languages, Literatures and Modern Cultures, University of Turin, Italy. She is contributor to and co-editor with Carmen Concilio of Word and Image in Literature and the Visual Arts (Mimesis International 2016). She has published articles on Anglophone cultures and literatures for the journals RiCognizioni, From the European South, Lectures du monde anglophone, CoSMo.

 

Library access:

Ask your university library to get library access: For institutional customers, ibidem’s catalogue is available via direct online access for their users and / or employees.

Please contact our library service at library@ibidem.eu for further information and for ordering an online subscription.

Posted By Janina Wittlif

The Child of the Sun

Feb 16, 2021 2:00:00 PM

"The Child of the Sun", edited by Silvia Irina Zimmermann, focuses on the two Romanian Queen Consorts, Elizabeth (Carmen Sylva) and Marie of Romania. Both of whom became famous - even internationally - as writers during their lifetimes. This lovingly collected, critically edited volume contains the most valuable stories and essays of the Queen Consorts, either in English translation (Carmen Sylva) or in the original English version (Marie of Romania).

Review:

”Silvia Zimmermann’s merit is a significant one, namely that of rediscovering Carmen Sylva who has not only been a creator, but also an important mediator between the Romanian and the German culture. […] Zimmermann’s substantial work is inspiring for everyone involved in the scientific research of German-Romanian cultural studies.”—Prof. Dr. Maria Sass, University of Sibiu (Romania)

About the book:

“Carmen Sylva, when she discovered that I was writing, instead of laughing at me and being ironical about my modest attempts at literature, encouraged me from the very first in every way. She was getting old, her imagination was running dry, and she declared that mine had come just in time to replace hers, which was a generous thing to say. She declared that it was a happy and blessed discovery that I could hold a pen, and no end of kind and enthusiastic things. She spurred me on to write, and each time I had finished a story she immediately wanted to have it so as to translate it into German.” Queen Marie of Romania about Carmen Sylva (Queen Elisabeth of Romania). The history of the monarchy in Romania and of its four kings would be incomplete without the story of the queen consorts, who seem to have been even more fascinating personalities than the kings were. Especially the first two queen consorts, Elisabeth (Carmen Sylva) and Marie of Romania, became famous as writers during their lifetime. They both wrote in their mother tongues, Elisabeth in German and Marie in English, and published many of their books, not only in Romania, but also abroad, thus reaching a widespread readership, worldwide publicity, and literary recognition.

About the author:

Dr. Silvia Irina Zimmermann is coordinator of the Research Center Carmen Sylva of the Princely Archive of Wied. She has published several books, new editions, and studies about the life and writings of Carmen Sylva (born Princess Elisabeth of Wied, the first Queen of Romania).

 

Library access:

Ask your university library to get library access: For institutional customers, ibidem’s catalogue is available via direct online access for their users and / or employees.

Please contact our library service at library@ibidem.eu for further information and for ordering an online subscription.

Posted By Janina Wittlif

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